Sky Hopinka, Graciela Iturbide, Nancy Spero, and More -ARTnews


Matthew Porter, Gold Hill, 2015, from the 2019 book, Matthew Porter: The Heights, published by Aperture.

©MATTHEW PORTER

TUESDAY, MARCH 26

Talk: Matthew Porter at Aperture Foundation
At this event, photographer Matthew Porter will talk about his new book The Heights, which comprises 25 images of vintage cars in midair. These images, which are from the artist’s “flying car” series, look like stills from action movies, only more surreal. The works also serve as studies of the automobile’s relationship to the history of American industry.
Aperture Gallery and Bookstore, 547 West 27th Street, 7–8:30 p.m. Donations $5

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27

Opening: “Useless: Machines for Dreaming, Thinking, and Seeing” at Bronx Museum of the Arts
Focusing on objects and activities without obvious functions or uses, this exhibition will bring together a selection of machines created by artists. The works on view were not constructed for scientific purposes, but are intended instead for spiritual and emotional fulfillment on the part of their viewers. Among the artists whose works are featured in the show are Jairo Alfonso, Fischli/Weiss, William Kentridge, Adriana Salazar, and Johanna Unzueta.
Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1040 Grand Concourse, 6–8 p.m.

Algis Griškevičius, The First Lithuanian Astronaut, 2009, toned photograph. “Useless: Machines for Dreaming, Thinking, and Seeing.”

COURTESY THE ARTIST

Screening: “An Evening with Sky Hopinka” at Brooklyn Academy of Music
As part of its film series “On Resentment,” which is co-organized with Triple Canopy, the Brooklyn Academy of Music will present works by filmmaker Sky Hopinka, who is a Ho-Chunk Nation national and a descendent of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. He has described his films, which include beguiling depictions of nature and address notions of heritage, history, and home, as “ethnopoetic.” A discussion with Hopinka, one of the curators of the film program at the 2019 Whitney Biennial, will follow the film screening.
Brooklyn Academy of Music, 30 Lafayette Avenue, 7 p.m. Tickets $15

C. J. Green’s Still Life Reflective Egg Cup, 2018, will be on offer by Byard Art at the Affordable Art Fair this week.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND BYARD ART

Opening: Affordable Art Fair at Metropolitan Pavilion
The biannual Affordable Art Fair returns to New York this week with the aim of offering works priced well below those at art fairs like the Armory Show and Art Basel, with rates that fall between $100 and $10,000. Among the exhibitors set to sell their wares at the event are Art Angler (New York), Cube Gallery (London), Galerie Duret (Paris), and Gallery Art Plaza (Seoul). Performances, tours, and artist talks are also on the agenda for the fair’s run. Admission will be free on Friday from 6 to 8 p.m.
Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street, 6–9 p.m. Tickets $70 online/$80 at the door

THURSDAY, MARCH 28

Exhibition: Graciela Iturbide at Throckmorton Fine Art
This exhibition surveys more than 50 years of work by the acclaimed Mexican documentary photographer Graciela Iturbide, whose art is currently the subject of a retrospective at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Though the show includes photos the artist shot in India, Italy, and the United States, its focal point is pictures taken in Iturbide’s home country. Among the works in the show are highlights from her photo essay Juchitán of the Women, which was completed over the first half of the 1980s and intimately documents matriarchal culture in the Mexican town of Juchitán de Zaragoza. “I have always said that my camera is a pretext to know the culture, its people, and the way of life,” the artist said. “My photographs are not political or feminist but I am when I need to be.”
Throckmorton Fine Art, 145 East 57th Street, 3rd Floor, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

Frank Bowling, Dan Johnson’s Surprise, 1969, acrylic on canvas. “Spilling Over.”

©2019 FRANK BOWLING, LICENSING BY ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NEW YORK, 2014

Performance: Ni’Ja Whitson at Danspace Project
Part of the title of the artist Ni’Ja Whitson’s forthcoming interdisciplinary work Oba Queen Baba King Baba is derived from the Yoruba word “Oba,” a term that refers to something along the lines of a genderless king. Whitson’s piece fuses movement, poetry, jazz, textiles, and video art in the creation of a work that takes inspiration from the personal narratives of queer and trans children of preachers. The piece is being performed by the NWA Project, a company Whitson runs in partnership with the performer Kirsten Flores-Davis.
Danspace Project, 131 East 10th Street, 8 p.m. Tickets $15/$22

FRIDAY, MARCH 29

Exhibition: “Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s” at Whitney Museum
This exhibition, which features works drawn from the Whitney’s collection, brings together eye-poppingly hued paintings from the 1960s and early 1970s. The show looks broadly at the role color painting played in the era, and it will feature monochromes, figuration, and much more with the aim of offering a multifarious view of the formal and political approaches artists took at the time. Among the works on view will be the vivid geometric abstractions of Alvin Loving, the majestic canvases of Ellsworth Kelly, and the vibrant figurative scenes of Emma Amos.
Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, 10:30 a.m.–10 p.m.

SUNDAY, MARCH 31

Exhibition: Nancy Spero at MoMA PS1
For her first major institutional show since her passing in 2009, this survey of work by artist Nancy Spero, which traveled from the Museo Tamayo in Mexico City and is curated by artist Julie Ault, includes more than 100 pieces created over the artist’s six-decade career. Known equally as an activist and an artist, Spero was a founding member of the first women’s cooperative gallery, the SoHo space Artists in Residence; the PS1 show aims to shine a light on Spero’s full output, from her Vietnam War–era paintings of sexualized weaponry to her photo-based pieces about the status of women in society.
MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Queens, 12–6 p.m.

Nancy Spero, The Goddess Nut II, 1990, handprinting and printed collage on paper, five panels.

MICHAEL BODYCOMB/©2019 THE NANCY SPERO AND LEON GOLUB FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS, LICENSED BY VAGA AT ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NY/COURTESY GALERIE LELONG & CO.

Opening: Dash Snow at Participant Inc.
The late artist Dash Snow is mythologized by some as a folk hero of a certain brand of 2000s-era New York art-world rebelliousness—an attitude that now feels distant from the city’s current cultural landscape. A peer of artists Ryan McGinley and Dan Colen, Snow, who died at age 27 in 2009, is remembered for his freewheeling lifestyle and for his art, which often made use of collage and sometimes included the artist’s bodily fluids. This exhibition focuses on Snow’s formidable archives; on view will be photographs and ephemera related to his practice.
Participant Inc., 253 East Houston Street, Ground Floor, 7–9 p.m.

Correction 3/25/19, 12:25 p.m.: An earlier version of this article misstated the price range for works on view at the Affordable Art Fair. Works on view at the fair can cost up to $10,000, not $100,000. The post has been updated to reflect this.





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