EBONY BLACK BOOK LIST • EBONY


Are you looking to diversify your household
reading material, switch up your coffee table book display, or start a book
club session with your homies?  We got
you – from cover to cover! 

We are proud to present the Black Book List, a list of literary works curated by EBONY that is simultaneously relevant, timely, and fresh. This compilation of books authentically seeks to represent the varied interests of our audience and the Black community, spanning beyond monolithic notions of what grabs our attention. Now more than ever, it is crucial that we continue to invest in real storytelling that is for us, by us. Join us each Thursday as we round up LIT literary reads for our Black, Woke & Well-Read community.

Be sure to check out previous literary round-ups that can be found on EBONY’s social media platforms, Instagram https://instagram.com/ebonymagazine?igshid=1k6o8bxwrd8uh, Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ebonymag/ and Twitter https://twitter.com/ebonymag?s=21. Here are our “Picks of the Week” for the week of November 5th:

I Once
Was Her by Teresa Caldwell

Often, Black women find themselves being many
things to many people while donning a brave face and hustling fearlessly
through their trials and tribulations. I
Once Was Her
utilizes the personal experiences of Teresa Caldwell,
entrepreneur and mom to Hip Hop Superstar, Bow-Wow as a tool to relate to the
myriad of Black women who have embarked upon a journey to success while
encountering obstacles, fighting the feeling of impending ineptitude and still
maintaining the drive to win in a world that does not always favor them.
Caldwell crafts an inspirational message of resilience and empowerment to
illuminate that even the most seemingly well put together woman has had her
share of ups and downs yet still, she prevails.

The
Undefeated by Kwame Alexander

Black Excellence is manufactured in all
shapes, sizes, and shades and is engrained into the DNA of all Black people,
whether realized or not. Kwame Alexander’s ode of love to Black America,
originally penned for ESPN’s The
Undefeated
is reimagined through the illustrative genius of Kadir Nelson,
winning of the 2020 Caldecott Medal, a 2020 Newbery Honor Book, and winner of
the 2020 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award. We can always use a little
reminder of our collective greatness and The
Undefeated
does just that.

The End
of White Politics: How to Heal Our Liberal Divide by Zerlina Maxwell

2020 has not only been the source of a
cultural reset to highlight the inherent flaws in our country’s system but has
further designated the need for decolonization, especially in our political
system in the midst of one of the most turbulent elections in American history.
Along with bringing #BlackGirlMagic to our screens on Peacock TV, Zerlina
Maxwell breaks down everything wrong with our current political system and how
to center true equity as progressives navigate the political landscape.

For
Every One By Jason Reynolds

In his renowned and timeless poem Harlem, Langston Hughes posed the
riveting question “What happens to a dream deferred?” But what happens if
everyone was allowed the privilege of dreaming big and without boundaries? For Every One is a reminder of the
benefit that is derived from taking the time to simply dream and to dream
limitless opportunities for one’s self and their futures, all the while
remembering the beauty of daring to imagine the impossible and turn it into
actionable goals. Whether it’s a better world or true happiness, Jason Reynolds
reminds readers that we can all dream and to do so faithfully.

How We
Fight For Our Lives By Saeed Jones

Through our individual journeys through this
life, we experience others and are, in turn, simultaneously experienced. These
moments begin to sculpt how we internalize our respective existence and find
our truest selves. Jones is honest, authentic, and unapologetic with his
documentation of how he has come to fight for his own life and hold space for
himself while navigating the shine of his truest light through other people’s
eyes, whether they recognize his brilliance or not.





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